Sea Cadet Knots

Reef Knot

What Knots Do Sea Cadets Learn?

In the UK Sea Cadets need to learn basic seamanship in order to gain promotion. The knots listed below are the knots that Sea Cadets are required to learn in order to achieve Seamanship Third Class.

  1. Overhand Knot
  2. Figure of Eight Knot
  3. Reef Knot
  4. Round Turn and Two Half Hitches
  5. Rolling Hitch
  6. Clove Hitch
  7. Sheet Bend
  8. Double Sheet Bend
  9. Timber Hitch
  10. Bowline
  11. Fisherman’s Bend
  12. Heaving Line Knot

Overhand Knot

Overhand Knot

Is the simplest of all the single strand stopper knots. Can be used as a simple stopper knot, preventing a rope from fraying or used to start the racking of a hawser. If a hawser has to remain belayed for any length of time, the two uppermost turns are racked (secured) to prevent the hawser unlaying.

Figure of Eight Knot

Figure of Eight Knot

Used as a stopper knot and also used to prevent a rope from fraying. The advantage of a figure of eight knot over the overhand knot, is that it is easier to undo after loading. The Figure of Eight Knot can also be used as a bend to join two ropes of equal size. known as the Figure of Eight Bend. How to Tie the Figure of Eight Knot Video.

Reef Knot

Reef Knot or Square Knot

The Reef Knot also known as the Square Knot. The Reef Knot is a simple binding knot and should never be used as a bend (joining two ropes) or where it will be experience heavy loading. Used to secure furled canvas or to finish off the racking of a hawser. WARNING – The Reef Knot should only be used for light duty work, never as a bend! How to Tie the Reef Knot Video.

Round Turn and Two Half Hitches

Round Turn and Two Half Hitches

A general purpose hitch for securing to a spar or a ring. Often used to secure the head-rope of a boat to a buoy. How to Tie a Round Turn and Two Half Hitches Video.

Rolling Hitch

Rolling Hitch

Used for securing ropes that have a lateral pull. For example can be used on a heaving line by attaching a Rolling Hitch to a pickup line, messenger on a gun line when Replenishment at Sea (RAS) or fastening a line to a spar. How to Tie a Rolling Hitch Video.

Clove Hitch

Clove Hitch

Use as a light duty way of securing an object, but does need a constant tension to remain secure.
Often used for securing items that hang vertically, for example paint pots, fenders attached to guardrail and stanchions, or securing a rope to a spar, fastening ratlines to the shrouds. How to Tie a Clove Hitch Video.

Sheet Bend

Sheet Bend

The Sheet Bend is used to join two ropes of similar size or even a smaller rope to a larger one. Also used for bending small sheets to the clews of sails. Can also be used for bending flags to halyards where hooks are not present. Just be aware that if the Sheet Bend is not under constant tension, it can shake loose. How to Tie the Sheet Bend Video. This will follow shortly.

Double Sheet Bend

Similar to the Sheet Bend, but a little more secure and slightly less prone to shaking loose. How to Tie the Sheet Bend Video . This will follow shortly.

Double Sheet Bend

Timber Hitch

Timber Hitch with Killick Hitch

A quick way of securing a rope temporarily around a spar or log. When Half Hitches are added for more control, they are known as Killick Hitches. Often used in handling cargo. How to Tie a Timber Hitch Video.

Bowline

Bowline

A good general purpose loop knot. Can also be used as a temporary eye in a rope. How to Tie a Bowline Video.

Fisherman’s Bend or Anchor Bend

A good and secure way of attaching a boat’s anchor cable to the anchor, also making a rope fast to a buoy.

How to Tie the Anchor Bend Video

Heaving Line Knot

Heaving Line Knot

A good way of adding additional weight to the end of a line to assist with throwing the line. Can be used instead of tying a Monkey’s Fist How to Tie the Heaving Line Knot Video.


Comments

Sea Cadet Knots — 2 Comments

    • ………… yes but rather sore on the fingers though?? Thanks for taking the time to view and also make a comment, very much appreciated.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *