Blackwall Hitch

Blackwall Hitch

Blackwall Hitch WARNING!

I am sure that Health and Safety would not permit the Blackwall Hitch to be used!! It should never be used if people are under the load. It should also never be used if the load or area beneath the load is fragile. It will slip if the load is not constant!

Blackwall Hitch

How to Tie the Blackwall Hitch

When I first came across the Blackwall Hitch, I really wondered if this particular hitch could actually do a task? First of all I tied the Blackwall around a hook and just tried to pull it apart with both hands. The Blackwall Hitch remained locked fast. I then thought that maybe I could overcome it with additional weight.

So off I trotted into the back garden and slung my hook over my steel girder that holds my ships bell. Once again I tied the single Blackwall Hitch around the hook and then swung off the rope. I was amazed that such a simple hitch could actually hold the weight of a fat knacker like me!

Tying the Blackwall Hitch onto a Crane Hook

Well having done my limited tests as detailed above, I can see why this hitch was used to attach loads to a crane hook. The Blackwall Hitch is just so easy to tie and then when the lift is complete, the hitch almost falls off the hook.

I would say that due to the fact that once the load is off the hitch, this is what can make using the hitch a possible accident waiting to happen! If you are going to use the Blackwall Hitch, I would seek advice prior to using it.

What are the Parts of a Hook?

During the course of researching this knot, I also discovered what the various parts of my hook are called. So if you are a little nerdy like me, you may enjoy this photo that I made up:

Parts of a Hook
Parts of a Hook

Mousing a Hook

Well, whilst we are on the subject of hooks, here is a hook that I found and could not resist adding some Mousing. The purpose of mousing a hook is that the mousing prevents whatever is attached to the hook from accidental coming off, especially when the hook is unloaded. Ashley’s Book of Knots goes on to say: “3267. Mousing a hook. If any considerable load is to be put on a block, the hook should be moused. A length of marline is doubled and a Bale Sling Hitch put over the bill which is slipped to the back of the hook. A number of turns are taken around the back and bill, the ends being led in opposite circuits. Cross the ends while there is still material and put on tight frapping turns in both directions from the centre. Then add riding turns back to the centre and finish off with a Reef Knot. This serves the double purpose of strengthening the hook and preventing the hook from spilling.”

The method used in the photo below was taken from Art of Knotting and Splicing, by Day; United States Naval Institute:

Mousing a Hook

How to Tie the Blackwall Hitch Video

In this short video, you will learn how to tie the Blackwall Hitch and the Double Blackwall Hitch. This hitch may be useful if you are a sailor, bushcrafter or a prepper.


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